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Falling In Reverse & All That Remains
Coming Home To Madness Tour

Skyway Theatre

09/27/17

DOORS: 6:00
BUY TICKETS
$23.5 ADV


Ages 15+ (or under 15 w/ Parent or Guardian)

*** SET TIMES ***

 

Doors: 6:00 pm

By The Thousands 7:00 – 7:30

All That Remains 7:50 – 8:50

Falling In Reverse 9:10 – 10:15 pm

 
Tickets are STILL AVAILABLE online and at the door for $28.50!

Falling In Reverse

The fine line between genius and insanity, self-seriousness and self-deprecation, implosion and explosion: that is the phantom zone where Falling In Reverse thrives. Falling In Reverse founder, frontman, and Machiavellian heroic supervillan / villainous superhero Ronnie Radke is the walking, talking, breathing, spitting, screaming, singing, fighting, loving, hyper-confident, sensitive, and vulnerable embodiment of a generation’s id. He’s the ego and super-ego in the classic Freudian sense, “slipping” all over the place with vicious bite and playful innuendo. With his music, art, and life, he is the living embodiment of broken homes, the frustrated contradiction of self-destruction, and everyday single-minded defiance against a world gone mad. Coming Home is his latest reinvention, coming full-circle back to the start, reinvigorated as mad scientist conductor of soaring, transcendent, engaging alternative pop-rock with massive radio hooks and a still-beating heavy metal hardcore heart. ‘Broken,’ ‘Loser,’ ‘Hanging On,’ ‘I Don’t Mind’ and ‘Coming Home’ are shocking in their epic scope, vibrant authenticity, and unrelenting dedication to personal truth. He shoved the world of Warped Tour kicking and screaming into the vintage decadence of the hard rock scene with the band he formed with his childhood best friend in Las Vegas. Then, even as countless bands followed in his wake, he was on the stylistic move, dominating the social media conversation and crowd sing-alongs with Falling In Reverse’s debut album, The Drug in Me is You, now based in Southern California. As Revolver, Kerrang!, Alternative Press, and the rest of the rock and metal press anointed him the scene’s new king on the strength of playful self-examinations-turned-anthems like ‘Raised By Wolves,’ ‘Tragic Magic’ and ‘I’m Not a Vampire,’ Radke and his crew shook up conventions once again, dropping the ironically titled Fashionably Late years before the audience at large had any suspicions about what would hit ‘em. What began as the “worst music video of all time” (according to media tastemaker VICE) turned into another 20 million YouTube views (for a band closing in on roughly 100 million views total) in ‘Alone.’ Like many parts of the eclectic album, it’s a rap-metal hybrid with a forward thinking step into modern electro beats. Like the best of Radke’s work, the song serves as both hyper masculine anthem and anxiety confessional. The press and fans followed the band’s every move, documenting each twist and turn. Just Like You mined similar territory with even more precision, from the title track to undeniable metalcore bangers like ‘Chemical Prisoner’ and ‘Guillotine IV (The Final Chapter)’ to the poppy crowd-mover ‘Sexy Drug’ and heartbreaking ballad ‘Brother.’ Coming Home is the most focused Falling In Reverse album, thematically and artistically. Crafted once again with Michael “Elvis” Baskette (Alter Bridge, Slash, Trivium), who has worked on every one of Radke’s records going back to the now-classic debut album from Escape The Fate, the record sees the group at their most atmospheric. It’s the latest bold step for a frontman who has defined himself by a mixture of courage and vulnerability, of bravado and introspection. He’s tightened his personal inner circle and withdrawn from the antics of the past as he’s poured even more of himself into his art. Coming Home is the album Radke dreamed about making as a kid, teaching himself to play guitar with Blink-182 and Green Day songs, rapping along to Dr. Dre and Eminem, skipping school, going to shows, and doing whatever it took to redefine his life beyond the hardscrabble circumstances of his upbringing, even when the obstacles were of his own design. Now it’s time to get Coming Home to as many people as possible. Falling In Reverse continues to champion the outsider, the cast aside, the underestimated, making music to empower and inspire life’s underdogs.

All That Remains

Given the world’s unpredictability, survival requires reaction. With so many factors beyond our control, the focus of life often becomes about how we respond to these outside forces. The same can be said for music. Regardless of how trends ebb and flow, artists must react appropriately in order to thrive and survive. Since 1998, All That Remains continue to progress, while clenching steadfast to the principals that etched their place at the forefront of 21st century hard rock. On their seventh full-length album, The Order of Things [Razor & Tie], the Massachusetts outfit—Phil Labonte [vocals], Oli Herbert [guitar], Mike Martin [guitar], Jeanne Sagan [bass], and Jason Costa [drums]—preserve an ethos of evolution. “You have to adapt to the world around you as opposed to expecting everything to adapt to your perspective,” claims Labonte. “You can’t really control what goes on in your life, you can only control your reaction. I’ve gotten a certain amount of peace from embracing this truth. That’s the way things go. This is literally The Order of Things.” It’s been quite a ride for All That Remains. The group reached another landmark with 2012’s A War You Cannot Win. It debuted at #13 on the Billboard Top 200 and yielded two hit singles. “Stand Up” ascended to #1 at Active Rock radio, a first for the band, while “What If I Was Nothing” landed at #2. The group hit the road for sold out shows alongside Volbeat and In This Moment in between incendiary festival appearances at Rock on the Range, Welcome to Rockville, Rocklahoma, and more. It would’ve been easy to simply repeat themselves creatively. However, they decided to bulldoze a new path for The Order of Things. For the first time, the band tapped Josh Wilbur [Lamb of God, Gojira] for production, cutting the bulk of the record in Massachusetts and fine-tuning vocals in Los Angeles. After four albums with Killswitch Engage’s Adam D behind the board, Wilbur offered not just a breath, but a gust of fresh air. “It was a good time to try something different with someone new,” affirms Mike. “It was helpful to have a completely new perspective. We had a crazy chemistry working together right away. He made a gigantic difference across the board. I’d love to do more records with him.” “It was a massive benefit,” Phil agrees. “We didn’t have any expectations about what we were supposed to do other than write quality music. Moreover, Josh brought his own angle on what All That Remains sounds like and could sound like. It’s a mixture of these two elements. That’s what this record is.” As a result, the group burst out of the gate with their heads held high once more. Commencing with an entrancing piano intro, album opener “This Probably Won’t End Well” tempers an arena-ready beat with an unshakable riff just before Labonte delivers a soaring refrain. “It just seemed like the obvious opening track,” says Labonte. “The piano bookends the album, and it just fell into place. It’s a strong song, and it flows. The subject matter is self-explanatory and really honest. It’s all in there.” The infectious “Divide”sees Labonte and Sagan’s voices entwine in a hypnotic harmony, but not before “No Knock” unleashes a brutal and bludgeoning stomp punctuated by searing guitars and the singer’s unmistakable growl. “In our entire history as a band, this is the first time I ever swore on a song,” Labonte chuckles. “I dropped the F-bomb twice, and the track needed that. I’ve never been the kind of guy who throws swears in to fill syllables. It fit the vibe for ‘No Knock’ though. I had to do it.” “It came together by accident like some of the coolest things we’ve done,” Mike goes on. “We can do anything in this band. Whether it’s a ballad or brutality, it fits within who we are.” At the same time, “For You” delivers one of the band’s most poignant, potent, and poetic hooks. Augmented by acoustic guitars and a bombastic energy, it’s yet another side of All That Remains. “That’s a personal song,” adds Phil. “It’s pretty straightforward. We were thinking of it a little differently.” Jeanne’s voice adds another dimension to The Order of Things standouts like “Bite My Tongue.” “We didn’t even know she could sing like that,” admits Mike. “Josh made her comfortable enough to try it, and she delivered. It makes for something very special.” After the hyper-charged thrashing of “Tru-Kvlt-Metal,” everything ends where it began with a piano during “Criticism and Self-Realization.” It creates a cohesive journey from beginning to end that beckons full attention. Those dynamics have defined All That Remains since day one. It’s why they’ve not only persevered while the musical landscape morphed and changed, but also why they’ve become veritable hard rock leaders, shaping the scene and then skyrocketing past its confines. Their worldwide album sales exceed over one million, while track sales surpass 1.5 million. Their position at the top of Active Rock radio remains indisputable with six singles going Top 10 at the format, three of which went Top 5 or higher. However, All That Remains continue reacting at every turn, igniting a personal revolution in the process. “There’s something for everybody,” concludes Mike. “It’s just about writing solid songs. It’s our philosophy and approach.” “To be flat out honest, all I want is for people to walk away from our shows or records feeling better,” Phil leaves off. “If they’re bummed out, they come to a show, and they leave feeling good, that’s great. I hope someone hears a song and feels even better than they did before it started. That’s who we are.”

By The Thousands